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extraterrestrialsDamon Linker, who is taking an existentialist Straussian line, speculates that the discovery of life elsewhere in the cosmos would take out Christian belief. That belief depends on special creation. So decisive evidence that there is nothing special about life on our planet would explode what are already our unreasonable pretensions about personal significance. Mr. Linker does not believe the existence of such extraterrestrial life is particularly likely. Or, if it is somewhere out there, we probably will not discover it. We are probably not even that special.

Well, I have no idea about the real existence of ETs, but the most likely outcome of our close encounter with them would not be dramatic ontological or theological transformations in our personal self-understanding.

Squid-baby-SS_01If (as we learn in Men in Black) the intelligent life forms are screwed-up aliens (wanderers and wonderers lost in the cosmos like us), that would, if anything, strengthen our faith (especially if they had faith). Our discovery of them might confirm the superiority of Christian anthropology to its rivals.

If the ETs were pure, untroubled, benign intelligence, as Carl Sagan imagines, then there would be faith issues, I think. We might consider the possibility that they are as we would be if it were not for the Fall. But pure consciousness or pure minds might disconfirm the conclusion we can reach based on our experience so far. Being open to the truth about all things and technological exploration are only qualities of persons, who are neither minds nor bodies nor some simple combination of the two.

I do not know of any “faith issue” that arises from the discovery of unconscious life somewhere else. In general, the Christian belief is that God cares for each of us persons in particular—special creation is on the personal level. That does not even preclude the existence of said creatures in quite different biological forms elsewhere in the cosmos.

And we can not forget the “personal issues” that arise in the absence of faith that cause so many scientists to hope without real evidence that there are ETs out there that can somehow save us from ourselves. If they are out there, they will probably take us out to satisfy their own needs or as a security threat.

interstellar-lackluster-and-inept-film-making-interstellar-overratedThen there is the decisively personal view of Interstellar, which is something like if there are more advanced beings out there who can save us from our natural fate, they would have to be more evolved versions of ourselves. I think the concluding scientific details of that film are presented as a form of wish fulfillment that is more reasonable than Karl Sagan’s. But it is a short hop from such musings about love and gravity to the conclusion that the logos that governs the cosmos is somehow personal.

Books on the topic of this essay may be found in The Imaginative Conservative Bookstore. Republished with gracious permission of the author. 

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5 replies to this post
  1. Mr Lawler, CS Lewis had no to trouble reconciling Christianity and ETs, and wrote a sci-fi trilogy on it. And, after all, which planet was chosen by God’s Son, on which to be sacrificed? I’ve never heard of Mr Linker.

  2. The money line: ” But it is a short hop from such musings about love and gravity to the conclusion that the logos that governs the cosmos is somehow personal.”

    “Hop”, indeed, perhaps we might say “leap of faith?” It appears, ontologically speaking, we require mystery.

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