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Paul Elmer More

Paul Elmer More (December 12, 1864 – March 9, 1937) was an academic, a journalist, an author and a Christian apologist. He, along with Irving Babbitt, stood as a leader of the “New Humanist” movement. He had a great skepticism of Christianity most of his life but accepted Christian truth in his later years. Some of his books included Platonism (1917), The Religion of Plato (1921) and The Christ of the New Testament (1924).
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Long ago, The Nation had a conservative editor. Paul Elmer More edited the already venerable magazine for five years just before the First World War. On joining The Nation, More was already an entrenched conservative; indeed,...

Paul Elmer More For, when everything is said, there could be no civilized society were it not that deep in our hearts, beneath all the turbulences of...
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Below are quotes from Russell Kirk’s first published academic article, “Tragedy and the Moderns.” The article appeared in January 1940, when Kirk was just beginning his second semester of his senior year in college. He wrote it, however, during...
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Paul Elmer More “I have disliked various politicians, Roosevelt for instance; but I have never felt towards any other man, not even Bryan, as I do towards Wilson. He has certain qualities which...
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What saved me from moral and emotional paralysis in this pseudo-philosophy was, I think, a deep-seated interest in humanity. I could not reason myself into believing that men are only machines; I could not...

In brief the need is to restore to their predominance in the curriculum those studies that train the imagination, not, be it said, the imagination in its purely aesthetic function, but...

Paul Elmer More's final statement—a religious one—as offered in his book, Pages from an Oxford Diary, is one of the great short works of the last century. If offers a profound statement of faith from a man...

As the great Princeton classicist and Nation editor Paul Elmer More viewed it, the Great War (1914-1918) had descended upon the world as a punishment by the gods. Nineteenth-century liberal man had forgotten how utterly flawed the...