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M. E. Bradford

Melvin E. "Mel" Bradford (May 8, 1934 – March 3, 1993) was a conservative political commentator and Professor of Literature at the University of Dallas. He was the author of "A Better Guide than Reason: Federalists and Anti-Federalists", "Original Intentions: On the Making and Ratification of the Constitution", "Founding Fathers: Brief Life of the Framers of the Constitution", and "The Reactionary Imperative: Essays Literary & Political."
drama
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The theater of modern America loves to shock but has overdone the trick so often that our nerves are jaded and immune to further outrage. The New York stage must be allowed to dry up and blow away, creating space for a rebirth...
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Because he was an antique Englishman, the Iron Duke of Wellington was able to recognize his campaigns as "war to the knife" and therefore to communicate his own inflexible view of their desperate significance to the men who marched beneath his banner... The...
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The literature of the American West embodies a clear perception of the frailty of corporate freedom and of the importance of men who have learned on their own to face down the barbarian, even though no one backs their play...
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Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Jeffrey O. Nelson as he explores the books and thinkers who shaped America's Conservative Renaissance. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher If a conservative order is indeed to return, we ought to know the tradition...

The "House Divided Speech'' is the wa­tershed of Abraham Lincoln's political career. In this address, given to the Republican state conven­tion that nominated their tall compatriot from Springfield to take the Little Giant's...

As a promising young centralist, Abraham Lincoln played the role of champion for what Professor Michael Oakeshott has called the "enterprise associa­tion" theory of the state. While serving as the elected representative of Sangamon (1834—1842), he first...

After over one hundred years, it continues to be almost impossible for us to ask certain basic questions about the role of Abraham Lincoln in the formation of a characteristically American politics. At every appropriate point of inquiry, the Lincoln myth...
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IV M.E. Bradford The principle underlying the Agrarian­-New Critic's position as literary critic, shared generally in the New Critical move­ment at large, may be simply put: Some poems are better than other...
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We spoke of much else besides : of friends and mentors and the tumors of both—their fortunes and misfortunes, their origins and our own; of illustrative stories, many...

Beware lest any man tempt you through philosophy and vain deceit. —Colossians 2:8 Quae est enim istorum oratio tam exquisita, quae sit anteponenda bene constitutae civiti publico jure et moribus? ("For what speech of theirs...

With the time and manner of his death Abraham Lincoln, as leader of a Puritan people who had just won a great victory over "the forces of evil," was placed beyond the reach of ordinary historical...

I Let us have no foolishness, indeed.* Equality as a moral or political imperative, pursued as an end in itself—Equality, with the capital "E"—is the antonym of every legitimate conservative principle. Contrary to most...
John Dickinson

Of all the men significantly involved in the major events leading up to and following from the American Revolution none has been so undeservedly neglected by our political historians as the mysterious John Dickinson. The oversight...

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join M.E. Bradford as he examines Roman history and the American founding. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher