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Southern Agrarians

Richard Weaver claimed his homeland was the "last nonmaterialistic civilization in the western world." Modernity to him meant at bottom institutionalizing most of the Seven Deadly Sins... Though his worth and stature were early established among them,...
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Liberalism is the refuge favored by intellectual cowardice, because the essence of the liberal's position is that he has no position... There is a saying by William Butler Yeats that a man begins to understand the world by studying...
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The power of imagination is to see things whole, to see things clearly, to see things with sanctity, to see things with love... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Alan Cornett as he discusses Wendell Berry's thoughts on environmentalism...
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This is the village where the funeral Stilted its dusty march over deep ruts Up the hillside covered with queen’s lace To the patch of weeds known finally to all. Of her virtues large tongues were loud As I, a stranger, trudged the streets Gay with...
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Wendell Berry’s poetry sings with the love of a man for his home, enticing the reader to embrace his vision of local agrarian economy as sufficient for the good life... “From knowledge of the forest comes/at...
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Looking at the whole of the South’s promise and achieve­ment, I would be unwilling to say that it offers a foundation, or, because of some accidents of history, even an example. The most that it offers is a challenge...
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Science Some of the would-be defenders were the New Humanists of Allen Tate's era. He criticized Paul Elmer More, Irving Babbitt, and Norman Foerster for their facile attempts to undo the de-humanizing effects of modern natural...
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The making of an industrialized society will extinguish the meaning of the arts, as humanity has known them in the past, by changing the conditions of life that have given art a meaning. For they have...
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Allen Tate's contribution to I'll Take My Stand poses a challenge. He concludes his "Remarks on Southern Religion" by stating that the way the Southerner can "take hold of his...
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You will be walking some night in the comfortable dark of your yard and suddenly a great light will shine round about you, and behind you will be a wall you never saw before. It will be clear to you suddenly that you were...
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In October of 1997, I attended the Southern Historical Association’s convention in Atlanta because I wanted to hear Paul Conkin’s presidential address, “Hot, Humid, and Sad.” What I heard was largely a history of the South in...
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IV M.E. Bradford The principle underlying the Agrarian­-New Critic's position as literary critic, shared generally in the New Critical move­ment at large, may be simply put: Some poems are better than other...
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We spoke of much else besides : of friends and mentors and the tumors of both—their fortunes and misfortunes, their origins and our own; of illustrative stories, many...
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Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Lee Cheek as he examines the importance of agrarianism in American life and the necessity of restoring its place within our culture. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher