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Poetry

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Jesus saved a hurting T.S. Eliot. And Eliot, the greatest poet of the twentieth century, thought Jesus could save us as well. A person can hate the conclusion, but if English is your mother tongue, then you cannot...
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He’s first to claim his faith’s a spur To politics—but in the cause of modern life As seen by a minority of folks who stir The democratic pot to greater strife, For whom the wooden spoon too oft becomes a knife; His faith’s a compass,...
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The work of editors and commentators is not only an interesting historical curiosity. Though the task of liberating important texts—whether from the dustbin of history, the barricade of a foreign language, or both—goes on behind the scenes and is often thankless, it is indispensable. For without it,...
2 910

Joseph Pearce, a hobbit in exile, muses on the Shire. O to be in England Now that April’s there, And whoever wakes in England Sees, some morning, unaware, That the lowest boughs and the brushwood sheaf Round the elm-tree bole are in tiny leaf, While the chaffinch sings on the orchard bough In England—now! —Robert Browning (Home-thoughts, from Abroad)  
culture
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Culture by its very nature tends to be centripetal, or to aspire toward some unity in its representational modes. The reason for this is that every culture polarizes around some animating idea, figment, or value, toward which everything that it produces bears some discoverable relation...
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The world has long sought to explain the mysteries of madness and genius and has largely failed to do so. Perhaps the better idea would be simply to allow madness and genius to go on explaining the world’s own mysteries to itself... Today’s offering in our...
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Sing now child in the valley-glade. Fret not over the blind judgment Of hyacinths bright and fragrant Or high pines yielding welcome shade. In strange tones, this wildwood has prayed To hear your...
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Poetry will not improve our students' job prospects or make them better office workers, but it is more important now than ever to teach poetry because it offers a unique antidote to the superficiality that dominates American culture. Poetry calls us back to tradition and calls us...
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Here is an array of poetry that just might fit your needs as you consider presents for any type of graduate... I have a privileged position. I really do. The graduating class at our small high school...
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Long, long ago this riverside tale starts No more the praise of divine holiness The land altered virgin to whore at heart Cities dot the plain praising only bliss Rise up! The divine oppressor has died! Nietzsche, Darwin, Derrida are your...
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For Exander, on his second birthday In this egalitarian age of trans(en)gendered equivalencies work-product art exists, no more or less, as a fungible proxy for any other unit of work-product art; none are good, so there can be none better; to be deemed best but sleight-of-hand prestige: counterfeit...
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If a democracy drifts into unlimited notions of freedom, the best course of action is not to strip citizens of freedom, but rather to educate them, so that they can correct any constitutional abuses that contributed or led the way to the abyss of nihilism... Introduction
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In Honor of Cardinal Robert Sarah On weekend strolls at dusk Or lonely morning drives Do we let silence sink in, Or rather, run and hide? Blaring music or conversations, From synthetic plastic to our ears, It matters not, we console ourselves As long as the quiet not...
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In their ego-centered quest for radical originality, too many contemporary poets fail to keep in mind what Catharine Brosman reminds us is the poet’s primary obligation in every age: “to say the oldest thing in the world as though it had never been said before”...