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Poetry

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Poetry will not improve our students' job prospects or make them better office workers, but it is more important now than ever to teach poetry because it offers a unique antidote to the superficiality that dominates American culture. Poetry calls us back to tradition and calls us...
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Here is an array of poetry that just might fit your needs as you consider presents for any type of graduate... I have a privileged position. I really do. The graduating class at our small high school...
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Long, long ago this riverside tale starts No more the praise of divine holiness The land altered virgin to whore at heart Cities dot the plain praising only bliss Rise up! The divine oppressor has died! Nietzsche, Darwin, Derrida are your...
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For Exander, on his second birthday In this egalitarian age of trans(en)gendered equivalencies work-product art exists, no more or less, as a fungible proxy for any other unit of work-product art; none are good, so there can be none better; to be deemed best but sleight-of-hand prestige: counterfeit...
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If a democracy drifts into unlimited notions of freedom, the best course of action is not to strip citizens of freedom, but rather to educate them, so that they can correct any constitutional abuses that contributed or led the way to the abyss of nihilism... Introduction
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In Honor of Cardinal Robert Sarah On weekend strolls at dusk Or lonely morning drives Do we let silence sink in, Or rather, run and hide? Blaring music or conversations, From synthetic plastic to our ears, It matters not, we console ourselves As long as the quiet not...
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In their ego-centered quest for radical originality, too many contemporary poets fail to keep in mind what Catharine Brosman reminds us is the poet’s primary obligation in every age: “to say the oldest thing in the world as though it had never been said before”...
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Wallace Stevens’ poetry is replete with examples of this effort to understand and articulate the poet as creator of things and meaning... Wallace Stevens wrote in a letter to a friend that “fter all, I like...
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A lantern dims within the old belfry; There are not now any bells to be rung; And yet there sleeps a song dreaming nobly In the silence where once three bells had swung. Within the heart of a fair land far-flung, Beneath stars that no...
4 2718

In this dull utilitarian age, there seems little less useful than poetry. What good is it? There are few who get rich writing or publishing poetry, and when it comes to practicality, it is practically good for...
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In the poetry of Jeremiah Webster's After So Many Fires, we have found Flannery O’Connor's Protestant counterpart. Though an Anglican, Dr. Webster weaves his words on the same theological loom as O'Connor, seeing in the world’s maddening duality a divine coherence... After So Many Fires by...
1 1400

Both John Paul II and T.S. Eliot give people something to hope for: Blessed John Paul speaks of a new springtime on the horizon signaling the emergence of a culture of life, and Eliot ends “The Waste Land” on a hopeful, if cryptic, note...
1 1085

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky, The flying cloud, the frosty light: The year is dying in the night; Ring out, wild bells, and let him die. Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring, happy bells, across the snow: The year...
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Two days after Christmas, on the 27th of December, the Church keeps the feast of St. John the Evangelist. It is fitting that the Gospel writer whose prologue delves so deeply into the mystery of Incarnation, and whose...