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Poetry

0 104

It looks just like a pile of wood Dumped in the middle of the town; They say that it is very good, And might be worth ten thousand pounds— Especially in spacious grounds, Like those of Buffy Bagshott, Bart; They say that it will do the...
0 276

In his "Elegy," Thomas Gray wrote a great, some­times mystifying and troubling poem, and, where the pastoral impulse is concerned, an admonishing one... No one born after the French Revolution, said the durable Talleyrand, can know how...
4 802

T.S. Eliot’s poem, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," shows that men do not need more pleasurable escapes or more time, but loving friends and an introduction to reality. They need to listen to human voices instead of the illusive mermaids out in the ocean. And...
0 326

Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold, And many goodly states and kingdoms seen; Round many western islands have I been Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold. Oft of one wide expanse had I been told That deep-brow'd Homer ruled as...
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W.H. Auden realized that J.R.R. Tolkien’s greatness was not simply the result of a capacity for the fantastic, but rather that it relied just as much on his scholarly acumen as on his imagination... W.H. Auden...
0 600

Jesus saved a hurting T.S. Eliot. And Eliot, the greatest poet of the twentieth century, thought Jesus could save us as well. A person can hate the conclusion, but if English is your mother tongue, then you cannot...
0 484

He’s first to claim his faith’s a spur To politics—but in the cause of modern life As seen by a minority of folks who stir The democratic pot to greater strife, For whom the wooden spoon too oft becomes a knife; His faith’s a compass,...
0 744

The work of editors and commentators is not only an interesting historical curiosity. Though the task of liberating important texts—whether from the dustbin of history, the barricade of a foreign language, or both—goes on behind the scenes and is often thankless, it is indispensable. For without it,...
2 677

Joseph Pearce, a hobbit in exile, muses on the Shire. O to be in England Now that April’s there, And whoever wakes in England Sees, some morning, unaware, That the lowest boughs and the brushwood sheaf Round the elm-tree bole are in tiny leaf, While the chaffinch sings on the orchard bough In England—now! —Robert Browning (Home-thoughts, from Abroad)  
culture
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Culture by its very nature tends to be centripetal, or to aspire toward some unity in its representational modes. The reason for this is that every culture polarizes around some animating idea, figment, or value, toward which everything that it produces bears some discoverable relation...
0 687

The world has long sought to explain the mysteries of madness and genius and has largely failed to do so. Perhaps the better idea would be simply to allow madness and genius to go on explaining the world’s own mysteries to itself... Today’s offering in our...
1 705

Sing now child in the valley-glade. Fret not over the blind judgment Of hyacinths bright and fragrant Or high pines yielding welcome shade. In strange tones, this wildwood has prayed To hear your...
2 1550

Poetry will not improve our students' job prospects or make them better office workers, but it is more important now than ever to teach poetry because it offers a unique antidote to the superficiality that dominates American culture. Poetry calls us back to tradition and calls us...
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Here is an array of poetry that just might fit your needs as you consider presents for any type of graduate... I have a privileged position. I really do. The graduating class at our small high school...