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Literature

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Without any ado, here are ten pictures that convey how far Western Civilization has fallen over the last centuries. 1. Mozart conducting one of his own settings of the Mass, circa 1780; modern church service with rock band   2. Crowd watching baseball game, early...
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In Honor of Cardinal Robert Sarah On weekend strolls at dusk Or lonely morning drives Do we let silence sink in, Or rather, run and hide? Blaring music or conversations, From synthetic plastic to our ears, It matters not, we console ourselves As long as the quiet not...
2 719

In their ego-centered quest for radical originality, too many contemporary poets fail to keep in mind what Catharine Brosman reminds us is the poet’s primary obligation in every age: “to say the oldest thing in the world as though it had never been said before”...
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It is always a dangerous and potentially deadly error to consider the enemy of our enemies to be our friend, patting him on the back while he is stabbing us in ours. The truth is that Dr. Harold Bloom is himself a servant of dark forces, which...
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Not only was Flannery O’Connor one of the most important Christian Humanists of the twentieth century, but she also well understood what made Christian Humanism what it was. While it might very well be conservative, it was always imaginative, allowing one to imagine what must be conserved...
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Wallace Stevens’ poetry is replete with examples of this effort to understand and articulate the poet as creator of things and meaning... Wallace Stevens wrote in a letter to a friend that “fter all, I like...
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Art, understood as a medium that engages the imagination and desires of its audience, can lure out aspects of its audience that would otherwise be kept hidden. Awareness of what desires the art excites and how one’s...

In his lifetime, Edgar Allan Poe’s renown lay primarily in his reputation as the foremost critic of the day. As a critic, he complained that four or five cliques controlled American literature by controlling the larger portion of the critical journals...
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To read is to become a seraphim, a polyglot, a beneficent hydra. We become more ourselves. We become better selves, better souls. We transcend being merely thinking machines or gluttonous beasts but transform into creative creatures who love, give, and are nourished by beauty...
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A lantern dims within the old belfry; There are not now any bells to be rung; And yet there sleeps a song dreaming nobly In the silence where once three bells had swung. Within the heart of a fair land far-flung, Beneath stars that no...
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The consoling power of P.G. Wodehouse's work arises not so much from the humor as from the detail in which he renders his worlds. Had he merely been funny, the consolation, the reprieve from the troubles of mundane life, would have been lesser....
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F. Scott Fitzgerald likened Jay Gatsby’s disillusionment and lack of purpose to that of the American people during the Roaring Twenties, those said to be in pursuit of the American Dream and materialistic success, ever reaching towards that green light, thinking the Dream would and will save...
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In this dull utilitarian age, there seems little less useful than poetry. What good is it? There are few who get rich writing or publishing poetry, and when it comes to practicality, it is practically good for...
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In the poetry of Jeremiah Webster's After So Many Fires, we have found Flannery O’Connor's Protestant counterpart. Though an Anglican, Dr. Webster weaves his words on the same theological loom as O'Connor, seeing in the world’s maddening duality a divine coherence... After So Many Fires by...