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Literature

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To read the Presocratic fragments is to re-enter a world where the simplest natural phenomena, such as boiling water, can set your bones quaking... To read the Presocratic fragments is to re-enter a world where the...
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I looked up from my writing, And gave a start to see, As if rapt in my inditing, The moon's full gaze on me. Her meditative misty head Was spectral in its air, And I involuntarily said, 'What are you doing there?' 'Oh, I've...
wilbur
1 162

Hope permeates God’s creation, our natural world and the world of nature, as concrete images and as an enduring cycle, a complete and unrelenting season in itself... Hope is not a finite thing as Emily Dickinson well...

In a distorted world, the Christian poet is ultimately like the blind man whose vision Christ restored to see truth through grace, and those who read the poet’s words will find their vision restored as well... Editor's Note: This essay was originally given as a part of a...

"Occasioned by General Washington's Arrival in Philadelphia, On the Way to his Residence in Virginia" The great, unequal conflict past, The Briton banish’d from our shore, Peace, heav’n-descended, comes at last, And hostile nations rage no more; From fields of death the weary...
4 548

The Shakespeare scholar who crossed swords with C.S. Lewis describes Lewis in the early 1950s, at the height of his fame, as “a red-faced, egg-headed, portly, jolly, middle-aged man, who was (like Old King Cole) fond of his pipe and his glass of beer...”
1 160

Break, break, break, On thy cold gray stones, O Sea! And I would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. O, well for the fisherman's boy, That he shouts with his sister at play! O, well for the sailor lad, That...
1 117

The Author's outcry against Octavianus Caesar Augustus as he contemplated Schleissen's marble effigy of Marcus Tullius Cicero. Extemporaneous poem. He was an ingrate, more a barbarian, Marcus, then even the lictor, when he left you beneath some lictor's ignominious blow. Octavianus was almost more...
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Flannery O’Connor’s fiction teaches us the need for charity toward other points of view, our personal tendency toward blindness, and the benefit of stories to enhance our vision... In 2014, I spoke at the American Embassy in Prague...
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In A Traveler From Altruria, William Dean Howells reminded Americans that if they continued to justify their egoism and selfishness at the expense of the common good, all that had profited them in this world would have been purchased at the cost of their souls
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Poetry is able to grant the reader the ability to perceive that reality, in spite of its often chaotic and random appearance, has some underlying unity by which it is bound together. This insight, in turn, provides the terms by which one may make peace with the...
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Great is the sun, and wide he goes Through empty heaven with repose; And in the blue and glowing days More thick than rain he showers his rays. Though closer still the blinds we pull To keep the shady parlour cool, Yet he will find...
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So much rain, so much life like the swollen sky of this black August. My sister, the sun, broods in her yellow room and won't come out. Everything goes to hell; the mountains fume like a kettle, rivers overrun; still, she will not rise and...
4 427

The eleven months during which Mary Shelley worked on Frankenstein were almost as macabre in real life as was the unfolding of the plot in the teenager’s fevered imagination... I’ve recently taught a course on Mary Shelley’s...