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The Music of the Republic series by Eva Brann

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1c-d. The activity of this higher logos, dialectic itself, is beyond Glaucon's present reach and no part of the preliminary survey. To set out on the dialectical road would be to see "no longer an image......
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1a. After the cave image Socrates considers with Glaucon the actual education of the philosophers. He begins significantly: "Would you like now to see in what way such men will come to be born and how...
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1. Book VII begins with this invitation to Glaucon: "Now, after this, liken our nature, as far as education and the lack of education is concerned, to the following sort of state" (514al). The sentence...
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4a. Let us return to the invitation to reflection that is extended to Glaucon by the sectioning of the realms "as if" they were a line; he must wonder why, as has been said, the
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1. Socrates yields to Glaucon. He will speak, though not of the Good itself but rather of its "offspring," which is most like it (506e). Socrates reminds Glaucon of the...
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A. 1. Glaucon's introduction to philosophy will itself have a prelude. He will discover for himself the meaning of "opinion," doxa.  Opinion in its various meanings determines the musical key of the different parts of the dialogue by...
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1a. We shall now show that, like Heracles, Socrates uses music to "civilize" his young guardian. He uses not the traditional music of the poets but his own restoration of true music; he shows...
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A. 1. Socrates is about to go on with the investigation of the unjust cities when he is again restrained, as once before on his way up to Athens (327), by a conspiracy of Polemarchus and...
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A. 1-2. We come now to the arguments, the logoi, that form the broad middle ring encircling the center. Just as the question concerning the connection of justice to happiness is answered by bringing...
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A. "Socrates begins most of his investigations not at the center but at the periphery..." At the center of Plato's second longest dialogue, the Constitution (Politeia), usually called the...