Books

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It was the late Stratford Caldecott who first struck up my interest in Harmony: A New Way of Looking at Our World by Charles, the Prince of Wales. Caldecott described the book as the...
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“For we shall see him as he is.” 1 John 3:2 The focus of my talk this evening is the Paradiso, the culminating and most beautiful part of Dante’s Comedy. The Paradiso has much to...
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Excerpt from Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society A second element of organic society involves the manner in which remedies are found. In searching for...
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The Romantic Movement began as a response to the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution. It, like every other pervasive cultural movement, had its own way of explaining the way the world works. In order to understand the roots of the Romantic...
1 719

Sounding like a modern, the Greek writer Callimachus once penned an epigram where he quipped, “a large book is a great misfortune.” Does not the legitimacy of such an assertion depend on the author and...
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The New York Times Review of Books once placed J.R.R. Tolkien's collective writings and stories about Middle-earth on its list of the twenty greatest literary works of the twentieth century. The ability of Tolkien to create an alternative society with a...
1 542

The detective story seems predicated on action. Even the most leisurely or snobbish mystery novels contain some semblance of motion, and typically it is the primary detective who does most of the legwork. Of course, the level of sweat is...

While recuperating from a knee and shoulder injury, I used my forced idleness to read two very different English writers: the eighteenth-century historian Edward Gibbon and the twentieth-century mystery novelist John Buchan. Despite the gravity of his magisterial...
1 625

It struck me that the key to the Bible is surely to be found at its very heart, in the center that holds all things together. The actual center turns out to be rather surprising. The center of the...
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When Russell Kirk published The Conservative Mind in 1953, Edmund Burke was a relatively obscure figure in British parliamentary history. Since that time, he has risen in stature, in no small part because of Russell Kirk’s...
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Richard Weaver introduces Ideas Have Consequences (1948) by explaining that at the root of “the dissolution of the West” is modern man’s denial of universal truth and his progressive assumption that “the most advanced...

If you write a book exposing our society’s aggressive LGBTQ agenda do not expect to be thanked. Do not expect to be noticed. Do not expect for your book to register on the cultural radar....
1 550

Disappearing Through the Skylight: Culture and Technology in the Twentieth Century by O. B. Hardison Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology by Neil Postman The polarities of boundlessness and limits...
3 715

Jeremy Bentham I remember visiting a professor of mine a few years ago during her office hours and seeing a “Bush/Cheney 1984” bumper sticker tacked on her cork-board. That was, I admit, probably my...